Category Archives: Audio

“Go, lovely Rose”

By Edmund Waller

Go, lovely RoseGo, lovely Rose—

Tell her that wastes her time and me,

That now she knows,

When I resemble her to thee,

How sweet and fair she seems to be.
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Tell her that’s young,

And shuns to have her graces spied,

That hadst thou sprung

In deserts where no men abide,

Thou must have uncommended died.
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Small is the worth

Of beauty from the light retired:

Bid her come forth,

Suffer herself to be desired,

And not blush so to be admired.
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Then die—that she

The common fate of all things rare

May read in thee;

How small a part of time they share

That are so wondrous sweet and fair!
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Listen to the Oklahoma State University Concert Chorale (Z. Randall Stroope, Composer/Conductor) sing “Go, Lovely Rose.”
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A reminder that we will celebrate the use of the rose as a poetic symbol or metaphor on January 25, 2018. Please bring your own illustration of this for reading and discussion and, if you wish, post it first on the blog via the CONTACT US page, or email it to me directly.

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Glenn Gould: Bach’s Italian Concerto, BMV 971

By Jan Zwicky

Glenn Gould Bach_s Italian Concerto, BMV 971- ImageGlenn Gould Bach_s Italian Concerto, BMV 971-TextListen to Glenn Gould play Bach’s Italian Concerto In F Major, BWV 971 (version 1981)
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We will be reading and discussing the poetry of Jan Zwicky and Lorna Crozier on February 22 and reading and discussing poetry inspired by music on June 28.

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A SONG OF THE ROSY-CROSS

by W. B. Yeats

A SONG OF THE ROSY-CROSSHe who measures gain and loss,

When he gave to thee the Rose,

Gave to me alone the Cross

Where the blood-red blossom blows

In a wood of dew and moss,

There thy wandering pathway goes,

Mine where waters brood and toss;

Yet one joy have I hid close,

He who measures gain and loss,

When he gave to thee the Rose,

Gave to me alone the Cross.
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N.B.
The spiritual symbol of the Rose in mysticism represents consciousness as matter. Consciousness is symbolized as a flowering process and an unfolding manifestation. The flowering of its petals represents man’s divine inner consciousness being revealed as layers of his being open up to reveal the Divine Inner Self.
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The Rose crucified on the cross is the symbol of the true divinity of humanity. The cross represents the four cardinal points of being in a balanced state. The crossing of the vertical and the horizontal lines represent the conjunction of time and eternity and other opposites. The vertical, being the Spiritual, creative, positive and active aspects of being, and the horizontal, the negative, material and passive aspects. It is at this conjunction point, representing balance and harmony, that the rose flowers and unfolds itself.
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A reminder that we will celebrate the use of the rose as a poetic symbol or metaphor on January 25, 2018. Please bring your own illustration of this for reading and discussion and, if you wish, post it first on the blog via the CONTACT US page, or email it to me directly.
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Listen to Sharon Shannon & Mike Scott sing and play “A Song Of The Rosy Cross.”

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Auden Anxieties

Auden AnxietiesDownload the LRB podcast: Seamus Perry and Mark Ford discuss the work of W.H. Auden, with reference to pieces from the LRB archive.

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The Afternoon of a Faun

The Afternoon of a Faunby Stephane Mallarme Translation from French by Roger Fry

These nymphs I would perpetuate.

So clear

Their light carnation, that it floats in the air

Heavy with tufted slumbers.

Was it a dream I loved?

My doubt, a heap of ancient night, is finishing

In many a subtle branch, which, left the true

Wood itself, proves, alas! that all alone I gave

Myself for triumph the ideal sin of roses.

Read the complete poem
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Listen to Leonard Bernstein conduct Claude Debussy’s Prélude à l’après-midi d’un faune
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“Prélude à l’après-midi d’un faune” (Prelude to the Afternoon of a Faun), is a symphonic poem for orchestra by Claude Debussy. It was first performed in Paris on December 22, 1894, conducted by Gustave Doret; the composition was inspired by the poem “L’après-midi d’un faune” by Stéphane Mallarmé, and later formed the basis for the ballet “Afternoon of a Faun”, choreographed by Vaslav Nijinsky.
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A final reminder that on this Thursday, October 26th, we will be reading and discussing poetry that has inspired music (e.g. “The Lark Ascending” by George Meredith and “The Afternoon of a Faun” by Stephane Mallarme). We will also include poetry written by popular lyricists such as Leonard Cohen and Joni Mitchell. Please bring your own favourite examples – whether on the original or expanded topic.

See the SCHEDULE PAGE for submissions to-date.

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Woodstock

by Joni Mitchell

WoodstockI came upon a child of God

He was walking along the road

And I asked him where are you going

And this he told me

I’m going on down to Yasgur’s farm

I’m going to join in a rock ‘n’ roll band

I’m going to camp out on the land

I’m going to try an’ get my soul free
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We are stardust

We are golden

And we’ve got to get ourselves

Back to the garden
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Then can I walk beside you

I have come here to lose the smog

And I feel to be a cog in something turning

Well maybe it is just the time of year

Or maybe it’s the time of man

I don’t know who I am

But you know life is for learning
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We are stardust

We are golden

And we’ve got to get ourselves

Back to the garden
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By the time we got to Woodstock

We were half a million strong

And everywhere there was song and celebration

And I dreamed I saw the bombers

Riding shotgun in the sky

And they were turning into butterflies

Above our nation
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We are stardust

Billion year old carbon

We are golden

Caught in the devil’s bargain

And we’ve got to get ourselves

back to the garden
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Listen to Joni Mitchell sing “Woodstock”
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Camille Paglia describes Joni Mitchell as “a major contemporary poet” and includes her poem “Woodstock” in her remarkable book Break, Blow, Burn, containing essays about what she regards as “forty three of the world’s best poems.”
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A selection of Joni Mitchell’s lyrics will be included in our study of “The Poetry in Popular Music” on October 26. Please bring your own favourite examples and post them first on the blog via the CONTACT US page, or email it to me directly. See the SCHEDULE PAGE for submissions to-date.

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Seditious verses of the royal Master of Music

One of Britain’s most influential composers and a favourite of the royal court, Sir Arnold Bax had another life as a would-be Irish nationalist poet, writes Petroc Trelawny

Seditious verses of the royal Master of MusicSir Arnold Bax wanted to die in Glencolumcille, Co Donegal. “I fancy that my last vision in this life will be the still brooding, dove-grey mystery of the Atlantic at twilight,” he said. He was seduced by the remote settlement, the savagery of the sea in winter, the rugged cliffs that stretch away from the houses, the live music he heard in Paddy John McNelis’s pub.
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Trad players were gathering outside another pub when I visited the Co Donegal village last month, recording a BBC radio documentary. Bax’s beloved beach was filled with sunburnt families, many of them day-trippers from Derry and Belfast whose journeys had been much simpler than his tortuous route via the Donegal Light Railway. The heat was breaking records, the sea absolutely flat, but it was not hard to imagine the potential fury of the waves, crashing hundreds of feet up the face of Glen Head. The natural beauty, and the sympathetic welcome Bax received from the villagers ensured that he returned year after year, later writing: “I came to know the people as I never knew any other community.”

Read the complete article
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Read “A Dublin Ballad: 1916” by Dermot O’Byrne

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Listen to “Tintagel”, by Arnold Bax (1883-1953)

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Bill Evans: “Alone”

By Jan Zwicky

Bill Evans AloneSound that makes night fall around it

Like the glow from a reading lamp.
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Rain on the roof, straight down.

The name of your name

Spoken without another’s.
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Rubato is a hand

You thought indifferent

Laid, briefest of moments,

On your sleeve.
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It walks away, then,

That sound, without looking back.

Lights up a Lucky. Says
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We hadn’t the ghost of a chance, says never

Let me go.
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Listen to the complete Bill Evans album, “Alone”
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Please note that we have tentatively scheduled musically inspired “Ekphrastic” poetry for June 28, 2018.
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On October 26th, 2017 from 5:00 PM  – 6:30 PM, at the Coach House, Green College, UBC, 6201 Cecil Green Park Road, Vancouver, Jan Zwicky and her husband, Canadian poet Robert Bringhurst, will present THE SHAPE OF THE WORLD: POETRY AND ECOLOGY.  See the EVENTS PAGE for details.

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Imtiaz Dharker reads “One Art” by Elizabeth Bishop

Imtiaz Dharker reads One Art by Elizabeth BishopListen to the beautiful voice of the Pakistan-born Scottish poet Imtiaz Dharker read Elizabeth Bishop, Louise MacNeice and Arun Kolatkar.
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For more information on Imtiaz Dharker, visit her website:

www.imtiazdharker.com.
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A reminder that we will be reading and discussing Elizabeth Bishop’s poetry on September 28. See the SCHEDULE PAGE for the list of featured poems.
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Please note that for the September 28th session only, we will be meeting in the mezzanine meeting room.

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What Is It You Feel I Asked Kurt

Diane Seuss

What Is It You Feel I Asked KurtWhat is it you feel I asked Kurt when you listen to

Ravel’s String Quartet in F-major, his face was so lit up

and I wondered, “the music is unlike the world I live

or think in, it’s from somewhere else, unfamiliar and unknown,

not because it is relevant to the familiar and comfortable,

but because it brings me to that place that I didn’t/couldn’t

imagine existed. And sometimes that unfamiliar place is closer

to my world than I realize, and sometimes it’s endlessly distant,”

that’s what he wrote in an email when I asked him

to remind me what he’d said earlier, off the cuff, “I don’t

recall exactly what I said,” he began, a sentence written

in iambic pentameter, and then the rest, later he spoke of two

of his brothers who died as children, leukemia and fire,

his face, soft, I’m listening to Ravel now, its irrelevancy.
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Listen to Ravel’s String Quartet in F-major played by the Alban Berg Quartet.

Maurice Ravel completed his String quartet in F major in early April 1903 at the age of 28. Dedicated to his friend and teacher Gabriel Fauré, the work was introduced in Paris by the Heymann Quartet on March 5, 1904. The quartet follows a strict four movement classical structure: Moderato très doux begins as a sonata form allegro, the following Assez vif-Très rythmé functions as the quartet’s scherzo, while Très lent acts as a contrasting foil. The last movement, Vif et agité, reintroduces themes from the earlier passages and ends with a striking finale.

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