Hallucination

by Arthur Symons

HallucinationOne petal of a blood-red tulip pressed
Between the pages of a Baudelaire:
No more, and I was suddenly aware
Of the white fragrant apple of a breast
On which my lips were pastured; and I knew
That dreaming I remembered an old dream.
Sweeter than any fruit that fruit did seem,
Which, as my hungry teeth devoured it, grew
Ever again, and tantalised my taste.
So, vainly hungering, I seemed to see
Eve and the serpent and the apple-tree,
And Adam in the garden, and God laying waste
Innocent Eden, because man’s desire,
Godlike before, now for a woman’s sake
Descended through the woman to the snake.
Then as my mouth grew parched, stung as with fire
By that white fragrant apple, once so fair,
That seemed to shrink and spire into a flame,
I cried, and wakened, crying on your name:
One blood-red petal stained the Baudelaire.

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1 Comment

Filed under Poem

One response to “Hallucination

  1. bill stuart

    Loved it Bruce

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